Subscribe to our mailing list

Mission News

Engaging the Word: Sunday, March 1st

Readings from Sunday, March 1st:
1st Reading: Genesis 22: 1-2, 9-18
Responsorial: Psalms 116: 10, 15-19
2nd Reading: Romans 8: 31-34
Gospel: Mark 9: 2-10

St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, concludes his Spiritual Exercises with a prayer known as the Suscipe (pronounced Soo shi pay). In that prayer the one making the exercises prays:
Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my under-standing, and my entire will, all I have and call my own.
You have given all to me. To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours; do with it what you will. Give me only your love and your grace; that is enough for me.
When I made the Spiritual Exercises as a Jesuit novice I remember praying that prayer over and over, eventually getting irritated at God. “Lord,” I said, “I keep offering you all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, and all I have and call my own, and I still have it!” Sitting back in exasperation, I realized that God wants me to have all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, and all I have and call my own, but at the same time to be free of it. In getting to the point of trusting God with all I possessed I wound up truly having what I was offering and the graces that they carried for the first time.

I think that this is the point of the rather terrifying story of Abraham and Isaac we hear in the first reading this Sunday. It is in recognizing that all we have comes from a loving God and finding the freedom to put it all back into God’s hands that we truly receive the gifts that God is offering us.

To make the offering of the Suscipe it takes faith and trust, and that’s what we pray for in the Psalm this week. It also takes courage. Our reading from Romans reminds us this week that if we are on the side of love and justice, we have nothing to fear: “If God is for us, who can stand against us?”

In the Gospel we hear of the Transfiguration. The closest disciples of Jesus see him for who he really is; they catch a glimpse of eternity through time. The reading also foreshadows the the suffering and death that awaits Jesus. I think it paired with the other reading to show that Jesus too need-ed human faith and courage to be true to himself and his mission. That he found that faith and courage and took a position in line with love and justice as a human being, disposes us to receive the gifts of faith and courage so that we too might stand at the side of God.

As we continue our Lenten journey, let’s pray for the grace of faith, let’s look to Jesus for instruction and courage, and through our loving action let’s open our eyes to catch a glimpse of eternity in time.



Engaging the Word: 03/01/2015

St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, concludes his Spiritual Exercises with a prayer known as the Suscipe (pronounced Soo shi pay).  In that prayer the one making the exercises prays:

 

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, all I have and call my own.

You have given all to me.  To you, Lord, I return it.

Everything is yours; do with it what you will.  Give me only your love and your grace; that is enough for me.

 

When I made the Spiritual Exercises as a Jesuit novice I remember praying that prayer over and over, eventually getting irritated at God.  “Lord,” I said, “I keep offering you all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, and all I have and call my own, and I still have it!”  Sitting back in exasperation, I realized that God wants me to have all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, and all I have and call my own, but at the same time to be free of it.  In getting to the point of trusting God with all I possessed I wound up truly having what I was offering and the graces that they carried for the first time.

 

I think that this is the point of the rather terrifying story of Abraham and Isaac we hear in the first reading this Sunday.  It is in recognizing that all we have comes from a loving God and finding the freedom to put it all back into God’s hands that we truly receive the gifts that God is offering us.

 

To make the offering of the Suscipe it takes faith and trust, and that’s what we pray for in the Psalm this week.  It also takes courage.  Our reading from Romans reminds us this week that if we are on the side of love and justice, we have nothing to fear: “If God is for us, who can stand against us?”

 

In the Gospel we hear of the Transfiguration.  The closest disciples of Jesus see him for who he really is; they catch a glimpse of eternity through time.  The reading also foreshadows the the suffering and death that awaits Jesus.  I think it paired with the other reading to show that Jesus too needed human faith and courage to be true to himself and his mission.  That he found that faith and courage and took a position in line with love and justice as a human being, disposes us to receive the gifts of faith and courage so that we too might stand at the side of God.

 

As we continue our Lenten journey, let’s pray for the grace of faith, let’s look to Jesus for instruction and courage, and through our loving action let’s open our eyes to catch a glimpse of eternity in time.

 

1st Reading: Genesis 22: 1-2, 9-18 ~  Responsorial: Psalms 116: 10, 15-19

2nd Reading: Romans 8: 31-34 ~  Gospel: Mark 9: 2-10

 



SFM Youth Group: Growing & Volunteering!

The SFM Youth Group has been sustained by core members and the wonderful work of our Religious Education director, Jenny Black Bear.  As the group continues to grow, they keep on meeting!  (more…)



Engaging the Word: February 22nd

Readings this week:
1st Reading: Genesis 9: 8-15
Responsorial: Psalms 25: 4-9
2nd Reading: 1 Peter 3: 18-22
Gospel: Mark 1: 12-15

Our first reading this week from Genesis, I think, call us to see that God is on the side of life, is for creation. We are called to look to the natural world and its wonders to see that God has entered into a relationship with all that is. A covenant is more than a contract but rather a relationship. In the act of creation God initiated relationship, a covenant, with creation. In the reading we here that “never again shall all bodily creatures be destroyed …” In fact even amidst the destruction described, God did not destroy all bodily creatures. In creation, even creation gone awry, there is always an ark, always something that carries the recognition of God’s love for what has been created. In our stormy times we need to find that ark, that fertile ground within us, and be assured that it will be enough. Remember that God is on the side of life.
The Psalm reminds to look to God for instruction. If God is on the side of life, so should we be. If God is compassionate, so should we be. If the Lord is kind and just, so should we be. In Christ, God come among us as one of us, we are set free to know that we can seek and find the signs given us by God in our human context, and inspired and instructed by those signs we can follow the Lord.
In this human and worldly context, however and as was Jesus, we can and will be tempted to follow paths of our own making. Jesus in the desert was tempted to use the gifts he had received from the Father for purposes not the Father’s. We too can be tempted to put our gifts and talents at the service of our own self-aggrandizement. As we battle with wild beasts who seek to lead us astray, we can be assured, however, that God’s messengers are always seeking in the same moment to encourage and nourish us. We do have the power, as Jesus proclaims, by the grace of God to choose to enter or to reject the Kingdom of God.
As we begin this Lent, let’s look for signs of God’s love for us in creation. Let’s turn to God for guidance. Let’s remain attentive to the true nature of our inspirations, recognizing which come from wild beasts and which come from angels. Let’s believe the Good News that the Kingdom of God is at hand and that any moment, as long as life in time endures, we may choose to step into an eternal life of love here and now.



Engaging the Word: February 15, 2015

Sunday’s Readings:

1st Reading: Leviticus 13: 1-2, 44-46
Responsorial: Psalms 32: 1-2, 5, 11
2nd Reading: 1 Corinthians 10: 31-33
Gospel: Mark 1: 40-45

The first reading this week may seem a little harsh, but what I think is important to take in is that the community is important. If one is contagious with a physical malady, a quarantine is not a bad idea. This is true as well if one has a bad attitude; it is usually not a good idea to rain on the parade or spoil the party. If one is feeling a little grumpy or irritable, maybe a little quiet time away is a good idea.

This reading from Leviticus is paired this week with Jesus healing a leper. It is worth noting that Jesus respects the Law. He heals the leper before sending him back to the group. Jesus cares about the health of the community, and he also cares about reuniting with the community those who have been separated from it.

Time with Jesus makes us fit for community. Jesus’ message of mercy and forgiveness is fundamental for healthy community life. Mercy and forgiveness are constitutive of the Gospel. If there were no mercy and forgiveness offered by God, then it would not be possible for us to stop, take stock of things, and then turn from our waywardness and step into the Kingdom of God. We need to experience ourselves as loved and forgiven sinners in order to fully enter into both the human community and the heavenly community.

The experience of healing and forgiveness prompts us as well to reach out to others. This theme was central to last week’s readings. When Peter’s mother-in-law is cured she immediately begins to serve others.

As we prepare to enter the season of Lent, let’s be sure to take some time away to be quiet with the Lord. To be still and receive his healing and forgiving touch. Let’s pray also that we receive the grace to reach out to others in need and share God’s love. We are made for one another. In finding our true identity let us work together and with our loving God to step into the Kingdom.

 



Ash Wednesday Masses

Ash Wednesday is February 18th! Mass times are as follows:

4:00 p.m. – Mass at St. Agnes
5:30 p.m. — Mass at St. Charles
7:00 p.m. – Mass at St. Bridget’s



FEBRUARY 12-HOUR FAMILY RECOVERY PROGRAM

The 12 Hour Family Recovery Program will be held this month on Tuesday, February 17th & Wednesday, February 18th, 2015, from 10:00am to 4:00pm at Icimani Ya Waste’ Recovery Center in St. Francis.

  • The 12-Hour Family program is facilitated by local native people who live on the reservation. The program includes video clips and live role plays and is structured to meet the needs of those family members who are living on the reservation. Family members will learn:
  • The side effects that drugs and alcohol have on the body and emotions.
  • The process of addiction and relapse.
  • Will learn about twelve step programs and other healthy ways designed for those who are affected by drugs and alcohol.
  • Learn different ways that will help you cope and maintain a less stressful life while coping with a person who is using drugs or alcohol.
  • The how and why alcoholism or drug addiction is a family disease.
  • About Co-dependency and have a greater understanding about the issues that surround the
    Co-dependent family member.
  • How to overcome these family roles and dynamics in a healthy way in order to bring about a healthier family structure.
  • Effective communication, listening and observing skills.
  • Co-dependency and enabling conduct and its role in the addiction cycle and in family structure.
  • Including more information related to families and their well –being.

Administrative Leave will be granted to any Tribal Employee who wishes to attend. The cost to attend the program is $50.00 per person, and must be paid in advance.For applications or questions, contact: Geraldine Provencial at (605)747-5547 or Jim at (605)259-3365 or email us at icimani@sfmission.org



Youth Group Makes Cookies for Elderly

This weekend, the SFM Youth Group met for a very special project.  The group baked cookies and Valentine’s Day cards to pass out to local Elders. The youth baked the cookies and made the cards, and once we were finished, we delivered them as a group!

Once we were done, we had extra cookies & cards, so we went to the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) Police Department and gave them cookies and cards as well!

Youth Group

We had lunch as a group, and after delivering cookies, we played sports! The kids all enjoyed themselves, and our next meeting is a board game and movie day on February 22nd.

Would you like to learn how you can support the youth of the Mission? Click here to learn about donation opportunities.

 



Engaging the Word: Sharing God’s Love

In our first reading this Sunday we hear Job lament. He does not turn his back to God, but he does wonder about the meaning of life. He had great wealth but now is afflicted and wonders about what is the point of such seeming futility. We can all get down from time to time, but the Psalm assigned for to-day reminds us of the Lord’s healing power and the Gospel reading today assures us that Jesus reaches out to us when we are suffering.

The Gospel reading from Mark reports that Simon’s mother-in-law was bed-ridden with a fever. Perhaps that is just the way it was, but as the Church pairs this reading today with the passage from Job I am inspired to imagine that maybe she was just down on life, seriously down, to the point of giving up. For one thing, her son-in-law had given up his fishing career to follow this itinerant preacher, and who knows what else may have been depressing her. When we give up on life, really begin to believe it is meaningless, we are really no good to anyone, including ourselves. Fortunately, Jesus whose fundamental message is that human life has ultimate meaning for us pays her a visit. He assures her that her flesh and bones and the world in which she lives is the means that the Creator of all that is has given her to receive the Love which creates, sustains, and transforms all creation. In fact her skin and bones interacting with the world are the only means available to her to receive and share God’s love.

Simon’s mother-in-law is transformed. It is fascinating, too, to note that when she receives the Good News and receives God’s love, she immediately begins to share it. Hope given to those in despair brings life to all the world. The Good News received multiplies and increases the glory of God by bringing human life to fulfillment. If we get down, let’s try to recognize the hand of Jesus reaching out to us to give us hope. If someone we know is burdened by life, let’s let our hands reach out to be the hands of Jesus.



Engaging the Word: 02/08/2015

In our first reading this Sunday we hear Job lament.  He does not turn his back to God, but he does wonder about the meaning of life.  He had great wealth but now is afflicted and wonders about what is the point of such seeming futility.  We can all get down from time to time, but the Psalm assigned for today reminds us of the Lord’s healing power and the Gospel reading today assures us that Jesus reaches out to us when we are suffering.

 

The Gospel reading from Mark reports that Simon’s mother-in-law was bed-ridden with a fever.  Perhaps that is just the way it was, but as the Church pairs this reading today with the passage from Job I am inspired to imagine that maybe she was just down on life, seriously down, to the point of giving up.  For one thing, her son-in-law had given up his fishing career to follow this itinerant preacher, and who knows what else may have been depressing her.  When we give up on life, really begin to believe it is meaningless, we are really no good to anyone, including ourselves.  Fortunately, Jesus whose fundamental message is that human life has ultimate meaning for us pays her a visit.  He assures her that her flesh and bones and the world in which she lives is the means that the Creator of all that is has given her to receive the Love which creates, sustains, and transforms all creation.  In fact her skin and bones interacting with the world are the only means available to her to receive and share God’s love.

 

Simon’s mother-in-law is transformed.  It is fascinating, too, to note that when she receives the Good News and receives God’s love, she immediately begins to share it.  Hope given to those in despair brings life to all the world.  The Good News received multiplies and increases the glory of God by bringing human life to fulfillment.

 

If we get down, let’s try to recognize the hand of Jesus reaching out to us to give us hope.  If someone we know is burdened by life, let’s let our hands reach out to be the hands of Jesus.

 

1st Reading: Job 7: 1-4, 6-7 ~  Responsorial: Psalms 147: 1-6

2nd Reading: 1 Corinthians 9: 16-19, 22-23 ~  Gospel: Mark 1: 29-39

 



Subscribe to our mailing list: