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Mission News

Looking back on Summer: Body, Mind & Soul camp!

The 2014 Body, Mind, and Soul Program was a huge success! Our Jesuit Volunteers – Mike Prate and Mike O’Neill, Betty, Beth, our cook and Jenny Black Bear were the staff for the Body, Mind & Soul summer camp, which were held in five communities this summer. The theme for the camps this year was “Weird animals, Where Jesus’ love is one of a kind.” Each day the team reinforced one simple Bible point, which made it easy for kids to remember and apply to real life. There were Bible memory buddies that the kids could wear, share, read, and take home, as well as rotation stations to help scripture stick.

Each day, kids moved throughout activity stations in groups. Every station was designed to reinforce the daily bible point in a hands-on, interactive way. There were KidVid Cinema where real kids shared real stories of how God is working in their lives. These powerful videos connect the Scriptures to modern life like never before. There was a Critter Cafe, where the kids were able to prepare yummy snacks each day and talk to one another about the daily bible verse. There were also games games, arts & crafts and lunch!

The first camp was held in Parmelee, which was our biggest camp, with between 40-50 kids attending each day. The second week, the camp was held in St. Francis, and we were able to give the kids a tour of the Buechel Memorial Lakota Museum. Tony Lusvardi, SJ gave the kids a tour of the St. Charles Catholic church and answered any questions they had about the Church and about the statues! We also had a bulling prevention class with Arlie Eastman, a school counselor at St. Francis Indian School. We were able to go to radio station KINI and record bully prevention messages that are played on the radio. Our camp in Rosebud was another one of our bigger camps, which we held at the CYO building. We had the Mission Body, Mind & Soul camp going on at the same time. We finished the series with our last camp in Spring Creek.

Bags decorated by the children!

Bags decorated by the children!

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Children at the St. Francis Camp

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High School Students helping out!

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Campers at KINI

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Campers at St. Charles

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Anti-Bullying Program

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Signs for Camp

We were blessed this year with two Jesuit high schools who came to help with our camps. St. Xavier school from Cincinnati, Ohio, came the 2nd week of June and stayed for 2 weeks, helping with the St. Francis and Rosebud camps. The Tampa Jesuit school, from Tampa, FL came the 3rd week of June, stayed for one week and helped with the Mission Camp. We were fortunate to have two schools here the same week, so we did two camps at once. We had Rosebud/Mission in the same week.

We are grateful and thankful for the two Jesuit schools for being able to come and help us make this years Body, Mind & Soul a huge success! Thank you to the staff and Jesuit Volunteers in Religious Education and all volunteers! We hope to go to more communities with our Body, Mind, and Soul Camps in the future!

 

 



Engaging the Word: 09/21/2014

In the parable of the laborers in the vineyard that we hear this Sunday Jesus is not offering advice on labor relations.  Jesus’ intention quite clear; he is attempting to describe the Kingdom of Heaven, highlighting how different are God’s ways from our ways, how different the Kingdom is from the world of labor and commerce.  Jesus is not knocking fair labor practices.  That simply is not the point.

In the reading from Isaiah that has been paired this week with the parable we are  counseled to “seek the Lord while he may be found,” to “call him while he is near.”  Well, when is that?  When may the Lord be found?  When is the Lord near?  The  Gospel passage today shares the good news that God is already looking for us, seeking us where we may be found, early in the day and in our final earthly moments.  God is always near, always coming to meet us right where we are.  So, our seeking is really about receiving the grace to hear God’s call to us in every moment.

The reward we receive when we hear God’s call and respond is the fullness of life in the Kingdom.  That reward is not gained by how much we do or for how long we work but by the graced reception of God’s love.  We do, however, need to do something.  We need to follow when God calls us.  We need to choose to step into the Kingdom, and we can make that choice in any moment.  When we step into the Kingdom, we find ourselves empowered for all the good and fruitful work that we do.

The challenge in this earthly life, of course, is that even if we step into the Kingdom in one moment, there is no guarantee that we will not step out of it in the next.  In time, in this life, we need to strive to respond in every moment to our God who is so near and always seeking us.  Has our last move put us into the Kingdom where in God’s sight everyone is first?  Let us pray for the grace to hear God’s call, step into the Kingdom of Heaven, and remain in God’s everlasting embrace of love.

 

1st Reading: Isaiah 55:6-9 ~ Responsorial: Psalm: 145:2-3, 8-9, 17-18

2nd Reading: Philippians 1:20-24, 27 ~ Gospel: Matthew 20:1-16

 



2014-2015 Religious Education Classes

The 2014-15 Religious Education classes have started for grades 1st -5th  for Rosebud and He Dog Elementary and 1st-8th grades for Spring Creek elementary.  Religious Education classes are release time during the school day.  After school Religious Education has started for St. Francis Indian school, parents/guardians will have to provide transportation for this class, which is held on Mondays from 4 p.m.-5 p.m. at the Icimani Building in St. Francis.

You can pick up applications at the school offices. If you have any questions, or would like more information, please call Jenny at 747-2436. Thank you!

SFM ReligiousEd Bulletin Board

Engaging the Word: September 14th, 2014

So, what is so great about Jesus?

There are many ways to answer that question.  One way that comes to mind based on this week’s readings has two parts.

First, by his words and deeds Jesus revealed himself as the Son of God.  Those closest to him were convinced that he had the words of everlasting life.  They really believed that there was nothing more true than the good news that Jesus preached, the news that the Kingdom of God is at hand, that at any moment any one of us can stop, take stock of our situation, correct course, and step into the Kingdom.  We can bring glad tidings to the poor and proclaim liberty to captives and the recovery of sight to the blind.  We can let the oppressed go free and      proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.  We can get in touch with our deepest and most true desires and find that these are God’s deepest desires deepest and truest desires for us.  We can then live that will of God no matter the cost.  In vesting Jesus and his teaching with ultimate authority, the followers of Jesus made Jesus their God, and any believer will tell you that it is a good thing that they did, because Jesus is God.

Second, Paul writes to the Philippians that Jesus “humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross.”  Yes, Jesus was (and is) 100% God, but Jesus was (and still is) 100% human.  The cross that each one of us bears as rational but limited beings is the knowledge that each one of us will die.  Fear of death is at the heart of what keeps us from living our lives in the eternal Kingdom of God, from knowing and doing God’s will, from living human life to the full.  Fear robs us of life.  When we fear, we can miss hearing the Good News and waste our lives.  Jesus’ life, death, resurrection, and      ascension holds up our death right before our eyes and puts it into true perspective, saving us from fear, saving us from  wasting our lives, and enabling us to enter into eternal life.

1st Reading: Numbers 21:4-9 ~ Responsorial: Psalm: 78:1-2, 34-38

2nd Reading: Philippians 2:6-11~ Gospel: John 3:13-17

 



Engaging the Word: September 7, 2014

Have you ever been trying to tell someone something and they just were not paying attention?

Maybe the person you were trying to reach physically could not hear you, or maybe he or she could hear but was choosing not to listen.

The readings this week admonish us to counsel those who have gone astray.  We really are our brothers’ and sisters’ keepers.  If a fellow human being is on the wrong path, we have an obligation to help him or her get back on track.

Now, this is not permission to be a busybody or to impose on others our own will on their behavior.  It is an instruction, however, to love and to help those who are not behaving in loving ways to start responding in gratitude to God’s gift of life.

How can one tell whether or not to speak up?  First, one needs to think about why the other person’s actions are agitating.  Is it just a matter of differences in personal taste, or is the person really missing out on life?  It is important, too, to remember that we are in this life together and that we do not have to figure things out alone.  It is important to keep in mind as well that if discussing the issue with others offers no hope of doing any real good that one needs to keep his or her mouth shut.  If love is not the motivation and there is no realistic possibility that discussing the matter will help, then plain and simple it is gossip and that is a sin, but it is also a sin if one can help and chooses to do nothing.

Maybe it would be helpful to recall the way in which our  Creator who has loved us into existence reaches out to us when we fail to respond in love, always calling out to us but never restricting our freedom.

1st Reading: Ezekiel 33:7-9 ~ Responsorial: Psalm: 95:1-2,6-9

2nd Reading: Romans 13:8-10~ Gospel: Matthew 18:15-20

 



Family Recovery Program Dates for September

The 12-Hour Family program will take place from Monday, September 8th – Thursday, September 11th, 2014 at the Icimani Ya Waste’ Recovery Center in St. Francis, South Dakota. The program will run from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. each day.

The St. Francis 12-Hour Family Recovery Program is facilitated by local native people who live on the reservation, program includes video clips and live role plays, the program is structured to meet the needs of those family members who are living on the reservation.

Family Members will learn:

  • The side effects that drugs and alcohol have on the body and emotions.
  • The process of addiction and relapse.
  • Will learn about twelve step programs and other healthy ways designed for those who are affected by drugs and alcohol.
  • Learn different ways that will help you cope and maintain a less stressful life while coping with a person who is using drugs or alcohol.
  • The how and why alcoholism or drug addiction is a family disease.
  • About Co-dependency and have a greater understanding about the issues that surround the Co-dependent family member.
  • How to overcome these family roles and dynamics in a healthy way in order to bring about a healthier family structure.
  • Effective communication, listening and observing skills
  • Co-dependency and enabling conduct and its role in the addiction cycle and in family structure.

Administrative Leave will be granted to any Tribal Employee who wishes to attend.

The cost to attend the program is $50.00 per person. Must be paid in advance.

For applications or questions you can contact: Geraldine at 747-5547 or Jim at (605)259-3365 or email: icimani@sfmission.net

 



Engaging the Word: 08/31/2014

You can’t have your cake and eat it too.

When is saving something really wasting something?

Cake is meant to be eaten.  If it doesn’t get eaten, it goes to waste.  So if you save it, you waste it.

Now for a cake there’s no pain involved in fulfilling its purpose.  Cakes do not experience agony and distress as they are put to work exciting taste buds.  Being what it is called to be and doing what it is called to do has no cost for a cake.

Each of the readings assigned for this Sunday point to our purpose, to what we humans are meant to be, and to the cost and life carried by being and becoming the persons we are called to be and become.

No matter how much we may fight it, God has called each one of us in a unique and personal way.  The truth is that we long for our Creator, and in the end, the only way we can really get close to God is to be the persons who we have been created to be.  Our uniqueness brings with it some struggle.  It may seem easier hide our gifts and talents, not developing them or using them.  Some of our quirks and tastes may make others laugh or ridicule us, but if we bury the persons that God has created to live and flourish and bring life to the world, then in saving ourselves from pain, in attempting to save our lives, we really lose them.

Jesus embraced the human life he was given, even at the price of death.  It’s really the only way to live.

Let’s pray for the grace to come to know God’s unique call to each one of us, to embrace these calls, and live them, no matter the cost.

 



Engaging the Word: The Twentieth week of Ordinary Time

An important theme in today’s readings is the universal call of Christianity. Many religions in the ancient world were national religions, but Jesus preached a different message. Jesus is the one savior of all mankind, so he taught that the Church would be open to peoples of all nations, races, and ethnicities. It is faith, not blood, that makes someone a Christian.

The woman who approaches Jesus for help in today’s Gospel is a Canaanite, a foreigner to the Jews. At first, Jesus seems to reject her harshly. But the woman persists with amazing humility, and Jesus soon responds with words of praise, “O woman, great is your faith!” This interaction be-tween Jesus and the Canaanite woman illustrates a common occurrence in the spiritual life: a time of testing and difficulty can lead to a deepening of faith. Jesus’ seemingly harsh words allow the Canaanite woman to show the true depth of her faith, something that amazes even Jesus. Many of the saints report having experienced a “dark night of the soul” when God seems to have left them; how-ever, by staying faithful through such a period of emptiness they reached an intimacy with God deeper than anything they’d experienced before. If at times God seems to be ignoring us, perhaps instead he is calling us to an even deeper faith.



Engaging the Word: August 10th, 2014

Today’s readings invite us to listen to God—and warn us against those “noises” that prevent us from hearing him. In the first reading, God’s mes-sage comes to the prophet Elijah as a “tiny whispering sound” after the distractions of storm, earthquake, and fire. In our own day, too, the Gospel is often difficult to hear because of louder, flashier messages from the media giving us false and negative images of the Catholic Church. Unfortunately, the Church’s enemies are not shy about loudly going on the attack.

Forces inside us can also make it hard to listen to God. In the Gospel, the disciples see Jesus walking on water, a truly miraculous event. Jesus invites Peter to come to him on the water, and at first Peter goes to him, doing something he never thought possible. But then fear gets a hold of him, and he starts to sink. Fear is one of the devil’s favorite weapons to hold us back. How often do we hesitate to reach out to others because of fear of being rejected? How often do we let fear of giving offense hold us back from speaking up for what is true? Fortunately, when attacked by fear, Peter does the right thing: he calls out to Jesus. When life seems overwhelming or frightening, we can turn to God to give us the courage and the strength to do what we never thought possible.



Family Recovery Times for August

In August, the 12-Hour Family Recovery program will be held from Monday, August 11th thru Thursday, August 14th , 2014 at the MilksCamp Community Bldg in Bonesteel, South Dakota.

The 12-Hour Family program is facilitated by local native people who live on the reservation, the program is structured to meet the needs of those family members who are living on the reservation.

Family Members will learn:

  • The side effects that drugs and alcohol have on the body and emotions.
  • The process of addiction and relapse.
  • Will learn about twelve step programs and other healthy ways designed for those who are affected by drugs and alcohol.
  • Learn different ways that will help you cope and maintain a less stressful life while coping with a person who is using drugs or alcohol.
  • The how and why alcoholism or drug addiction is a family disease.
  • About Co-dependency and have a greater understanding about the issues that surround the Co-dependent family member.
  • How to overcome these family roles and dynamics in a healthy way in order to bring about a healthier family structure.
  • Effective communication, listening and observing skills
  • Co-dependency and enabling conduct and its role in the addiction cycle and in family structure.

Administrative Leave will be granted to any Tribal Employee who wishes to attend, and there is no cost to attend.

For applications or questions you can contact: Geraldine at 747-5547 or Jim at (605)259-3365 or email: icimani@sfmission.net



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